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Serjeant at Law Ring

A Serjeant-at-Law (SL), commonly known as Serjeant, was a member of a bar association of the English and Irish Bars. The position of serjeant-at-law (servientes ad legem) or sergeant-comptoir was centuries old; There are records dating back to 1300 that identify them as descendants of figures in France before the Norman Conquest, making the Serjeants the oldest officially created order in England. The College began in the 16th century as a small group of elite lawyers who did much of the work in the central common law courts. The traditional dress of a serjeant-at-law consisted of a coat, a dress and a fur coat. [40] The dress and coat were then adapted to the dress worn by the judges. [41] The cut and color of this dress varied – records from the king`s private wardrobe show that judges were ordered to wear scarlet, green, purple, and miniver robes, and that serjeants were instructed to wear them. [42] In 1555, the new Serjeants had to wear scarlet, brown, blue, mustard and Murrey robes. [42] When the order ended, the ceremonial dresses were red,[43] but Mr. Serjeant Robinson recalled that towards the end of the order, black silk dresses were everyday court dresses and that the red dress was only worn on certain formal occasions.

[44] The coat was originally a coat worn separately from the dress, but gradually found its place in the uniform as a whole. John Fortescue describes the coat as “the principal ornament of the Order,”[45] which differs only from the coat worn by judges because it is covered with lambskin rather than mini-hair. [45] The coats were not worn by lawyers, but only by serjeants in court. [46] Serjeant`s Inn was a legal inn for serjeants-at-law. It operated from three locations, one at Holborn, known as Scroope`s Inn, which was abandoned in 1498 for that of Fleet Street,[20] which was demolished in the 18th century,[21] and one at Chancery Lane, which was demolished in 1877. [22] The hostel was a voluntary association, and although most serjeants joined after their appointment, they were not required to do so. [23] There were rarely more than 40 serjeants, even members of the judiciary, and the inns were significantly smaller than the court inns. [24] Unlike the Inns of Court, Serjeant`s Inn was a private establishment resembling a gentlemen`s club. [25] The corresponding Irish rank of serjeant-at-law survived until 1919. Alexander Sullivan, the last Irish Serjeant, spent the second half of his career at the English bar and was always called Serjeant as a courtesy. The main character of C.

J. Sansom`s Shardlake novels, hunchbacked lawyer Matthew Shardlake, is a serjeant-at-law during the reign of King Henry VIII of England. The Fleet Street Inn had existed since at least 1443, when it was rented by the Dean of York. By the 16th century, it had become the main inn before it was burned down in the Great Fire of London. It was rebuilt until 1670, but the end finally came in 1733.[26] The Fleet Street Inn had fallen into a “state of ruin” and the Serjeants had been unable to obtain an extension of their lease. They left the estate and he returned to the dean. [27] With the creation of the Queen`s Council (or “Queen`s Council Extraordinary”) during the reign of Elizabeth I, the Order gradually began to decline, with each monarch choosing to create more King`s or Queen`s Counsel. The exclusive jurisdiction of the Serjeants ended in the 19th century, and with the enactment of the Magistracy Act of 1873 in 1875, it was felt that it was not necessary to have such numbers, and no others were created. The last appointed was Nathaniel Lindley, later Law Lord, who retired in 1905 and died in 1921. The number of Irish serjeants was limited to three (originally one, then two). The last appointment was A. M.

Sullivan in 1912; after being called to the English bar in 1921, he retained Serjeant Sullivan as his courtesy title. A wide gold ring (at least 22 carats) with ribbed bands flanking the text in capital letters “+ LEX. IS. ARMA. REGVM” (the law is the armor of kings), separated by a cross and small stars; Traces of black enamel inside the lettering. Extremely rare. A serjeant to the king or queen was a serjeant-at-law appointed to serve the crown as legal adviser to the monarch and his government, just like the attorney general of England and Wales. The tradition ended when the rank of Serjeant-at-Law was abolished by the Judicature Act of 1875. According to an expert on these rings, up to 100,000 rings were made during this 300-year period, but he found only 97 of the rings.

A Serjeant-at-Law (SL), commonly known as Serjeant, was a member of a bar association of the English Bar Association. The position of serjeant-at-law (servientes ad legem) or sergeant-comptoir was centuries old; There are documents dating back to 1300 that identify them as descendants of figures in France before the Norman Conquest. The Serjeants were the oldest officially created order in England, created by Henry II. The College began in the 16th century as a small group of elite lawyers who did much of the work in the central common law courts. With the creation of the Queen`s Counsel (or “Queen`s Extraordinary Council”) during the reign of Elizabeth I, the Order gradually began to decline, with each monarch choosing to create more King`s or Queen`s Councils. The exclusive jurisdiction of the Serjeants was established in the 19th century. With the enactment of the Judicature Act 1873 in 1875, it was felt that it was not necessary to have such figures, and no other figures were created. The last Serjeant-at-Law was Serjeant Sullivan († 1959). The last purely English Serjeant-at-Law was Lord Lindley († 1921). The new Serjeants threw a party to celebrate and handed out rings to their close friends and family for the occasion. The King, Lord Chancellor and other personalities also received rings.

[36] The main courts were suspended for that day, and the other serjeants, judges, Inns of Court leaders, and sometimes the king attended. [37] Serjeant`s Inn and the Inns of Court were not large enough for such an occasion, and instead Ely Place or Lambeth Palace were used. [38] The festivals gradually lost their importance, and in the 17th century the fortress gradually lost importance. In the nineteenth century, they were small enough to be kept in inns.